Bookworm’s best books of 2013

Since it’s the last day of the year, I’ve selected my top books out of the books I read in 2013. Though I liked most all of the books I read, it wasn’t very difficult to pick the ones that stood out. And so, here they are:

5. The Case of the Gilded Fly by Edmund Crispin

gildedfly

This is the first of the Gervase Fen mysteries, a series of detective novels set in Oxford. I find that Oxford has an atmosphere that lends itself quite well to crime mysteries. With plenty of literary allusions, quirky Oxford academics and a clever plot, The Case of the Gilded Fly was brilliant and I will definitely read the other books in the series.

4. Gillespie and I by Jane Harris

gillespieandibook

Staying in the same vein, I was hooked almost from the first page of Gillespie and I. It is such an amazing tale, wonderfully told. I was on the edge of my seat for the most part, trying to not miss any clues in this strange and creepy story, and yet, I was still shocked at the end.

3. Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

fiesta

My very first Hemingway was not at all like I expected. I adored his writing in Fiesta, a book that I could (and probably should) read many more times as it has so many different layers. I find that I quite enjoy books like this or like The Great Gatsby, books that on the surface appear to be very simple and almost boring but are in fact so intricate and multidimensional. I plan on reading more of Hemingway’s works in 2014.

2. Inés of my Soul by Isabel Allende

Oh how I love Allende! It’s no surprise to find one of her books on this list, I believe this happens every year. She is a storyteller like no other and it seems there’s no end to her talent. In Inés of my Soul, there’s an epic story and an equally epic love story, based on historical facts about the conquest of Chile. This was simply enchanting.

1. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

I wish I had a more cheerful book as my favourite of the year. The Handmaid’s Tale is so scary and disturbing I often wanted to stop reading. But at the same time it is a remarkable dystopian story, exquisitely told, and I could not put it down. Atwood can certainly write very well but I think it was all the themes that she touches on in this book that made it stand out for me.

What books were your favourites in 2013?

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Bookworm’s best books of 2013

  1. mannomoi says:

    I’m currently reading a book of short stories by Edmund Crispin, whom I’d never head of until I came upon this book in a sale, but it is indeed delightful. I was quite happy to see him on your list! And all of the other books you have mentioned here are on my TBR, and this encourages me to devour them soon-ish –I think I’ll be going for Hemingway.

    Congrats on a fruitful year and happy new year! 😀

  2. theshabbyrabbit says:

    The Sun Also Rises is one of my favorite books ever!! I read The Handmaid’s Tale this year too. I liked it but it just wasn’t one of my favorites and i’m not sure why.

    Gillespie and I will be going on my 2014 list!!

    • bookworm says:

      The writing was so exquisite in The sun Also Rises, wasn’t it? I can see how The Handmaid’s Tale would fail to become a favourite due to its quite disturbing themes.
      I can’t wait to hear what you think about Gillespie and I!

  3. Lucia says:

    I love end of the year posts. 🙂

    I’ve never heard of Edmund Crispin’s detective novels before, they seems good, I’ll check them out. I remember I added “Gillespie and I” to my TBR list after reading your review.
    I really liked “The Handmaid’s Tale”; I only read 2 books by Margaret Atwood and I found both of them quite disturbing but SO good. She does write well!

    Happy new year!

  4. Charlie says:

    I haven’t read it yet but I can see why you picked The Handmaid’s Tale. Sometimes the best books aren’t very nice, which seems bad, but makes sense. I want to read the Harris sometime, too. Happy new year!

    • bookworm says:

      Happy new year Charlie! I know what you mean about The Handmaid’s Tale; it wasn’t terribly pleasant to read but I still think it was excellent.

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s